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Entertainment Weekly article details country’s ‘identity crisis’

Entertainment Weekly article details country’s ‘identity crisis’

NEW FACE OF COUNTRY? Reigning ACM Entertainer of the Year Luke Bryan performs an acoustic set in August. His "Crash My Party" album released as the 3rd highest debut, all genres, this year with 528,000 copies making him one of only two country artists to have sold more than a half million copies of an album in a single week since 2008. Photo: Associated Press

An article in the current issue of Entertainment Weekly details the country music genre’s “identity crisis” by, in part, detailing a chronological war of words among some of its biggest stars.

From a Twitter feud between Jason Aldean and Zac Brown to artists lamenting the lack of women in country music and finally to the increasing number of non-country acts appearing on award shows and compilations, the article says country music has gone “crazy,” plunging Nashville into a “civil war.”

Among the chief offenses to fans of classic country, the magazine says, were the inclusion of acts such as rapper Nelly and rocker Lenny Kravitz at country music shows this year.

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