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White House wants ‘crash-proof’ cars

White House wants ‘crash-proof’ cars

CRASH TEST: A NHTSA report says the technology could prevent as many as 592,000 left-turn and intersection crashes a year — saving 1,083 lives in the process. Photo: Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration says it’s taking the first step toward making future cars and light trucks less likely to crash.

The White House is asking the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to begin drafting rules to require anti-crash technology in new vehicles.

The technology will let cars warn each other of potential danger in time to avoid collisions.

Cars and light trucks will come equipped with a radio signal that will continually transmit a vehicle’s position, direction, speed and other information. Other cars with similar equipment will receive the same data — and computers will alert drivers to the possibility of a collision.

A NHTSA report says the technology could prevent as many as 592,000 left-turn and intersection crashes a year — saving 1,083 lives in the process.

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