Fake signs campaign for anyone but Rob Ford

Fake signs campaign for anyone but Rob Ford

FORD NATION:Toronto Mayor Rob Ford sits in the council chamber as councillors look to pass motions to limit his powers on Monday Nov. 18. Photo: Associated Press/THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

With offers of “just smoking pot” and the ability to never get caught urinating in public, it’d be hard to believe that the fictional campaign signs for the Toronto mayor’s race are real. But, they are getting a lot of attention.

The signs, a project of the website, appeared Monday in Toronto’s Trinity Bellwoods Park, according to

Ford Nation is the nickname of the campaign and general persona of the 44-year-old mayor who has admittedly smoked crack-cocaine and had a series of very public gaffes.

The No Ford Nation website and Facebook page offer information on the other candidates running for Toronto’s top job, as well a cartoon series of some of Ford’s more memorable – err, embarrassing – moments as mayor.

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